Not available at this time.
Course projects which give practice in different types of art historical writing (catalogue entry, book or exhibition review, interpretative essay, technical report) combined with in-class exercises in the writing of analytical and explanatory prose. Topic focuses from semester to semester on a period, culture and/or individual artist. Required of all art history majors in their junior year. (Planned for Fall)
The discipline of art history and the tools of visual analysis it employs. Focus on issues such as Classicism, "primitive" art, realism, and modernity, presented in roughly chronological order. Discussion of these issues in relation to contemporary visual culture. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
Was Caravaggio a "rebel" artist? What was so revolutionary about his art? How did it relate to violence of his times, to the Catholic Church, to his own sexuality? These are some of the questions we will investigate in this course. Together we will create a virtual exhibition of Caravaggio?s paintings examining the themes of his art and investigating their resonances for our lives today and for contemporary art. Assignments include assembling the collaborative exhibition website, as well as writing individual research papers.
First half of a survey of art history from prehistoric times to the 20th century. Chronological and systematic approach; either a basis for more detailed study of individual periods in upper-level art history courses, or a solid general foundation for a heightened appreciation of the heritage of art. More professionally oriented than ART-HIST 115. Background for upper-level art history courses; required of majors. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
We will explore potential career paths with guest speakers from museums, libraries, archives, galleries, auction houses, and more. The course is designated to help majors begin to plan art history careers through coursework, internships, and other work experiences.
First half of a survey of art history from prehistoric times to the 20th century. Chronological and systematic approach; either a basis for more detailed study of individual periods in upper-level art history courses, or a solid general foundation for a heightened appreciation of the heritage of art. More professionally oriented than ART-HIST 115. Background for upper-level art history courses; required of majors. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
This lecture class surveys the practice of architecture in Europe and America from 1750 to 1914. It looks at the economic, social and political forces that led to the creation of new building types, institutions and technologies peculiar to the nineteenth-century by focusing on figures and movements such as Schinkel, Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc, Frank Lloyd Wright, Haussmann's Paris, Olmsted's Central Park, the Gothic Revival, Arts and Crafts, and Art Nouveau. A particular emphasis will be placed upon the architect's role as a critic seeking social reform. Valuable for anyone concerned with design.
This lecture class surveys the practice of architecture in Europe and America from 1750 to 1914. It looks at the economic, social and political forces that led to the creation of new building types, institutions and technologies peculiar to the nineteenth-century by focusing on figures and movements such as Schinkel, Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc, Frank Lloyd Wright, Haussmann's Paris, Olmsted's Central Park, the Gothic Revival, Arts and Crafts, and Art Nouveau. A particular emphasis will be placed upon the architect's role as a critic seeking social reform. Valuable for anyone concerned with design.
This course explores how and why a preoccupation with the care and commemoration of the dead was given concrete reality in art, architecture, and ritual throughout the Middle Ages. Proceeding in a largely chronological fashion, we will explore changing conceptions of death itself and the afterlife from the third through the fifteenth centuries. Critical in our investigations will be an understanding of the many ways in which the living and the dead were dependent upon one another throughout this period, and how all forms of the visual arts mediated this interdependence. Among the topics to be explored are the Apocalypse, the development of a purgatorial conscious, the creation of a class of the "special dead" (saints), confrontations with pandemics (The Black Plague), and - perhaps the most haunting images of all - the Macabre.