Course projects which give practice in different types of art historical writing (catalogue entry, book or exhibition review, interpretative essay, technical report) combined with in-class exercises in the writing of analytical and explanatory prose. Topic focuses from semester to semester on a period, culture and/or individual artist. Required of all art history majors in their junior year. (Planned for Fall)
We will explore potential career paths with guest speakers from museums, libraries, archives, galleries, auction houses, and more. The course is designated to help majors begin to plan art history careers through coursework, internships, and other work experiences.
First half of a survey of art history from prehistoric times to the 20th century. Chronological and systematic approach; either a basis for more detailed study of individual periods in upper-level art history courses, or a solid general foundation for a heightened appreciation of the heritage of art. More professionally oriented than ART-HIST 115. Background for upper-level art history courses; required of majors. (Gen.Ed. AT, G)
Ancient Rome was filled with portrait statues, which have been called "the other population" of this capital city. What social purposes did they serve and how did they speak to Roman audiences? In this seminar, we will explore Roman portrait sculpture, both private and public, in contexts as varied as imperial baths, lower-class tombs, elite gardens and religious sanctuaries, to investigate the way portraits served as catalysts for the imagination and memory, at the same time that they broadcast social and even political status. The seminar will pull together a wide range of sources of information to bear on this material, drawing on archaeological excavations, the texts of ancient authors such as Cicero and Pliny, and the inscriptions affixed to statues by those who dedicated them, as well as the works of art that survive, both paintings and sculpted examples.
First half of a survey of art history from prehistoric times to the 20th century. Chronological and systematic approach; either a basis for more detailed study of individual periods in upper-level art history courses, or a solid general foundation for a heightened appreciation of the heritage of art. More professionally oriented than ART-HIST 115. Background for upper-level art history courses; required of majors. (Gen.Ed. AT, G)
History of the discipline, methodological orientations, and the conceptual and technical framework for art-historical research. Required of all M.A. candidates in Art History during first year of study.
This graduate seminar surveys modernism's long engagement with the totally designed domestic interior from the totally designed domestic interior from the 19th century gesamtkunstwerk to the remarkable 20th century interiors of Frank Lloyd Wright and Eileen Grey to the electronic, media saturated environments of the 1960s anticipated by critic Reyner Banham and beyond. The theoretical writings of Walter Benjamin, Henri Lefebrve, Tonino Griffero and others will inform discussions.
The discipline of art history and the tools of visual analysis it employs. Focus on issues such as Classicism, "primitive" art, realism, and modernity, presented in roughly chronological order. Discussion of these issues in relation to contemporary visual culture. (Gen.Ed. AT, G)
This undergraduate seminar explores the onset of modernity in sculpture from the late 18th- to the early 20th-century in works by Canova, Degas, Rodin, Picasso, Duchamp, and others. From Degas Little Dancer Aged Fourteen to Rodins Gates of Hell, what sort of specifically modern desires motivated the production of sculpture? What kinds of new experiences did modern sculpture offer? In a world where sensory perception was proven to be manipulable and easily stimulated by new technologies, how did art define aesthetic experience? Our overarching theme will be sculptural experimentation with form, color, and material in an effort to destabilize preconceived expectations of viewers. The course will culminate in a student-curated digital exhibition.