This is the first course in the four-course Citizen Scholars Program. In this course, we ask how society would be organized if it truly were good, and students are encouraged to unleash their imaginations?to envision the social structures and shared understandings that would characterize a truly good society. Cross-cultural examples and models from utopian fiction will help generate ideas about alternatives. The vision of the good society articulated by each student by the end of this course will serve as a point of departure for the next 3 semesters in the program, as students develop tools to enable them to work toward their vision. Throughout this course (and throughout each of the following 3 courses), each student will participate in a weekly service placement with a community-based organization which works to improve the quality of life for its constituents. Preparing for and learning from these experiences will be a major component of the course. Other major components include inquiry into the meanings of the social identities we each carry, and practice in the skill of dialogue with people whose perspectives and life experiences differ significantly from our own.
This course engages students in the practice of Community Service Learning, including consideration of what constitutes appropriate and effective community service, and how to learn deeply from this experience. Each time it is offered, it is organized around a topic of public concern that draws on a variety of perspectives, and it places students with community organizations in service that relates directly to the course topic. Students therefore integrate academic learning with experiential learning. In preparing for community service, students will explore the course topic, and also explore what it may mean for them in their service to cross boundaries of race, ethnicity, class, or other strands of social identity. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)
This course engages students in the practice of Community Service Learning, including consideration of what constitutes appropriate and effective community service, and how to learn deeply from this experience. Each time it is offered, it is organized around a topic of public concern that draws on a variety of perspectives, and it places students with community organizations in service that relates directly to the course topic. Students therefore integrate academic learning with experiential learning. In preparing for community service, students will explore the course topic, and also explore what it may mean for them in their service to cross boundaries of race, ethnicity, class, or other strands of social identity. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)
This is the first course in the four-course Citizen Scholars Program. In this course, we ask how society would be organized if it truly were good, and students are encouraged to unleash their imaginations?to envision the social structures and shared understandings that would characterize a truly good society. Cross-cultural examples and models from utopian fiction will help generate ideas about alternatives. The vision of the good society articulated by each student by the end of this course will serve as a point of departure for the next 3 semesters in the program, as students develop tools to enable them to work toward their vision. Throughout this course (and throughout each of the following 3 courses), each student will participate in a weekly service placement with a community-based organization which works to improve the quality of life for its constituents. Preparing for and learning from these experiences will be a major component of the course. Other major components include inquiry into the meanings of the social identities we each carry, and practice in the skill of dialogue with people whose perspectives and life experiences differ significantly from our own.
This course engages students in the practice of Community Service Learning, including consideration of what constitutes appropriate and effective community service, and how to learn deeply from this experience. Each time it is offered, it is organized around a topic of public concern that draws on a variety of perspectives, and it places students with community organizations in service that relates directly to the course topic. Students therefore integrate academic learning with experiential learning. In preparing for community service, students will explore the course topic, and also explore what it may mean for them in their service to cross boundaries of race, ethnicity, class, or other strands of social identity. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)
Description not available at this time
The course explores disability rights history and current topics such as effective community engagement, advocacy, self-advocacy, inclusion, social identities, policy, and the social dimensions of living with disabilities in the US today. Students, in small groups, participate in weekly service, engaging in enrichment and socialization activities with individuals living with disabilities, in collaboration with a local community partner (generally one evening/week).
IMPACT! is a service-learning RAP. Through this year-long program, you can learn how to make a positive impact on the larger community around UMass, and you can find a place for yourself as part of that community. (Gen.Ed SB, U)