This lecture course examines the history of the modernist movement from 1914 to the present in relationship to the primary ideologies of the 20th and 21st centuries, socialism, capitalism, and globalism. It considers the work of the founding figures - Wright, Mies, Gropius and Le Corbusier - and significant themes such as the individual vs. the collective; European vs. American approaches; modernism beyond the West; and the impact of popular culture and new technologies.
This seminar surveys modernism's long engagement with the totally designed domestic interior from the totally designed domestic interior from the 19th century gesamtkunstwerk to the remarkable 20th century interiors of Frank Lloyd Wright and Eileen Grey to the electronic, media saturated environments of the 1960s anticipated by critic Reyner Banham and beyond. The theoretical writings of Walter Benjamin, Henri Lefebrve, Tonino Griffero and others will inform discussions.
This lecture course examines the history of the modernist movement from 1914 to the present in relationship to the primary ideologies of the 20th and 21st centuries, socialism, capitalism, and globalism. It considers the work of the founding figures - Wright, Mies, Gropius and Le Corbusier - and significant themes such as the individual vs. the collective; European vs. American approaches; modernism beyond the West; and the impact of popular culture and new technologies.
Introduction to museum methods and practices. Issues such as the role of museums in society, the development of col-lections, conservation, curatorial and registrarial responsibilities, museum management, public relations, funding, ethics, and the production of exhibitions and catalogs. Includes field trips to area museums. Consent of instructor required.
A unique city, seemingly floating on water, Venice has gone from being the capital of a world emporium of trade to the center of Disneyworld-like tourism. This course traces the history of the city and its empire from the time of its founding after the fall of the Roman Empire to the present day. Topics covered include: the city's construction on water; its fantastical architecture; its famous tradition of painting by artists such as Bellini, Titian and Tiepolo; the invention of glass-making, the printing press, and map-making; the culture of Grand Tour and the masked ball in the eighteenth century; and the modern period of economic decline and cultural romanticization. We will conclude by considering contemporary problems of preserving and revivifying this world wonder in the face of climate change.
The course explores a range of intellectual and multi-disciplinary approaches to the practice of art history and the interpretation of works of art through case study examinations of the works of 19th century American realists Winslow Homer and Thomas Eakins. The course integrates student reflections on skills and knowledge gained from General Education and Art History courses with application of knowledge, critical analysis, research, and creative thinking skills to the contemporary practice of art history. The course fulfills the General Education Integrative Experience requirement for History of Art & Architecture majors.
Historical survey of art, architecture, and urban development from the Baroque to the present; the social context in which style has developed. Discussion of the same material from a critical and topical point of view. Background for upper-level art history courses; required of majors. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
History of architecture from antiquity to the present explained chronologically and thematically. Iconic western and non-western buildings and cities compared. Students learn research skills, vocabulary and to read architectural plans. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
Historical survey of art, architecture, and urban development from the Baroque to the present; the social context in which style has developed. Discussion of the same material from a critical and topical point of view. Background for upper-level art history courses; required of majors. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)