Course projects which give practice in different types of art historical writing (catalogue entry, book or exhibition review, interpretative essay, technical report) combined with in-class exercises in the writing of analytical and explanatory prose. Topic focuses from semester to semester on a period, culture and/or individual artist. Required of all art history majors in their junior year. (Planned for Fall)
This course examines Renaissance notions of the self in relation to the genre of portraiture. We will begin by studying theories of Renaissance subjectivity, as well as the rise of the portrait in fifteenth-century Italy. The bulk of the course will focus on the first half of the sixteenth century?after Mona Lisa (c. 1505)?a period of great creativity and expansion in the genre. Artists include Leonardo, Raphael, Titian, Lotto, Parmigianino, and Bronzino. Student research projects may address the concept of portraiture outside art history and/or outside the Renaissance period.
The discipline of art history and the tools of visual analysis it employs. Focus on issues such as Classicism, "primitive" art, realism, and modernity, presented in roughly chronological order. Discussion of these issues in relation to contemporary visual culture. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
This lecture class surveys the practice of architecture in Europe and America from 1750 to 1914. It looks at the economic, social and political forces that led to the creation of new building types, institutions and technologies peculiar to the nineteenth-century by focusing on figures and movements such as Schinkel, Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc, Frank Lloyd Wright, Haussmann's Paris, Olmsted's Central Park, the Gothic Revival, Arts and Crafts, and Art Nouveau. A particular emphasis will be placed upon the architect's role as a critic seeking social reform. Valuable for anyone concerned with design.
This lecture class surveys the practice of architecture in Europe and America from 1750 to 1914. It looks at the economic, social and political forces that led to the creation of new building types, institutions and technologies peculiar to the nineteenth-century by focusing on figures and movements such as Schinkel, Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc, Frank Lloyd Wright, Haussmann's Paris, Olmsted's Central Park, the Gothic Revival, Arts and Crafts, and Art Nouveau. A particular emphasis will be placed upon the architect's role as a critic seeking social reform. Valuable for anyone concerned with design.
History of the discipline, methodological orientations, and the conceptual and technical framework for art-historical research. Required of all M.A. candidates in Art History during first year of study.
We will explore potential career paths with guest speakers from museums, libraries, archives, galleries, auction houses, and more. The course is designated to help majors begin to plan art history careers through coursework, internships, and other work experiences.
First half of a survey of art history from prehistoric times to the 20th century. Chronological and systematic approach; either a basis for more detailed study of individual periods in upper-level art history courses, or a solid general foundation for a heightened appreciation of the heritage of art. More professionally oriented than ART-HIST 115. Background for upper-level art history courses; required of majors. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
First half of a survey of art history from prehistoric times to the 20th century. Chronological and systematic approach; either a basis for more detailed study of individual periods in upper-level art history courses, or a solid general foundation for a heightened appreciation of the heritage of art. More professionally oriented than ART-HIST 115. Background for upper-level art history courses; required of majors. (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)
This course is an open-ended exploration of the possibilities of relating the social discussion of race and other categories of identity with the artistic medium of drawing in global contemporary art (since the 1960s). Drawing, once considered a preparatory medium for painting and design, is now a major medium in its own right. However, drawing is resistant to mid-century modernist theories of artistic mediums and can instead be seen as an "anti-medium": its contemporary definition is not based on internal properties, such as line or the use of paper, but rather its ability to connect disparate practices, such as hand-making and digital expression; genres, such as art and design; and communities, such as art and political activism. Given its historical associations with intimacy and writing, drawing is uniquely suited to discussions that connect the personal to the political. The course will explore current discussions of race in light of its intersection with gender, sexuality, class, ethnicity, politics, and history, as it develops materially in relation to open-ended formulations of expression and design.